Westminster Seminars

Event details

  • Sunday | February 5, 2023
  • 09:45 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Galbreath Chapel and via Zoom
  • 412-835-6630

The Westminster Seminars offer a dynamic schedule of topics to help us live more fully as thoughtful Christians in today’s world. Everyone is always welcome. Come when you can – no preparation or homework. The Zoom option makes it extra easy to catch a seminar if you aren’t at church. Each Sunday, the Zoom meeting opens at 9:30.

Also, you can watch or listen later on the Westminster website – under News & Media – here: https://www.westminster-church.org/news-&-media/westminster-seminars.

Join Zoom Meeting
The Zoom meeting opens at 9:30 for greetings and conversation.
us02web.zoom.us/j/86753114914?pwd=UmxkMWF0RUdCT1FoV3AxUlZ4REhtZz09
Meeting ID: 867 5311 4914
Passcode: 209681

Being Police/Being Policed: The History of Crime and Control in Pittsburgh

February 5 - 26
Elaine Frantz, Professor of History, Kent State University

As Pittsburgh grew from its 18th-century origins to the thriving industrial city of 1945, so did efforts to keep law and order among the people. Historian Elaine Frantz will guide us through the fascinating history of crime and control in our city.

February 5 – Governing the Ungovernable: 1764-1816

February 12 – From Constable to Police: 1816-1861

February 19 – Professionalizing the Force: 1861-1919

February 26 – The Policed Have Their Say: 1919-1945

Elaine Frantz is a Professor of History at Kent State University who specializes in how people used, thought about, and experienced violence in the 19th century. She has published two books: Manhood Lost: Drunken Men and Redeeming Women in the Nineteenth-Century United States (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002) and Ku-Klux: The Rise of the Klan during Reconstruction (University of North Carolina Press, 2015), and was part of a team that edited a collection of writings by incarcerated Pittsburgh men: Life Sentences: Writings from an American Prison (Belt Press, 2019). She is now working on a history of policing in Pittsburgh from its earliest days to the end of the 20th century: Being Policed/Being Police: Policing Pittsburgh, 1763-2001. Her mission is to tell the history of policing in Pittsburgh in a way that fully humanizes both those who the city has paid to bring about law and order, and those who have found themselves the object of their work.